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'''2003: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]'':'''
 
'''2003: ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]'':'''
:Denethor appears almost entirely devoid of hope and highly irrational after learning of Boromir's death. He demands his remaining son go on essentially a suicide mission to reclaim enemy-captured Osgiliath and stubbornly refuses to light the [[warning beacons of Gondor]] to call for the aid of [[Rohan]] (Pippin lights it instead at Gandalf's behest). Denethor then claims [[Théoden]] betrayed him when Sauron's armies begin attacking [[Minas Tirith]]). In the book, the danger of his madness is that it seems to follow a certain logic; Sauron ''does'' have vastly superior forces, all of which he has surely shown to the Steward in the ''palantír''. His actions, however, do not immediately proclaim his insanity; the Osgiliath mission is less obviously suicidal, as the city has not yet been overrun, and the warning beacons have indeed been lit, although Denethor expects little help.
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:Denethor appears almost entirely devoid of hope and highly irrational after learning of Boromir's death. He demands his remaining son go on a suicidal mission to enemy-captured Osgiliath and refuses to light the [[warning beacons of Gondor]] to call for the aid of [[Rohan]] (and then claiming [[Théoden]] betrayed him when [[Sauron]]'s army attack [[Minas Tirith]]). In the book, the danger of his madness is that it seems to follow a certain logic; Sauron ''does'' have vastly superior forces, all of which he has surely shown to the Steward in the ''palantír''. His actions, however, do not immediately proclaim his insanity; the Osgiliath mission is less obviously suicidal, as the city has not yet been overrun, and the warning beacons have indeed been lit, although Denethor expects little help.
  
:When Faramir is brought back from Osgiliath on his horse into the throne room, seemingly dead, Pippin attempts to stop Denethor from cremating his son (and himself with him), who he is sure is still alive. After Denethor knocks Pippin away, he falls onto the fire, and, in flames, runs out of the throne room and off the highest ledge of Minas Tirith, killing himself.
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:When Faramir is brought into the throne room, seemingly dead, Pippin attempts to stop Denethor from cremating his son, who he is sure is still alive. After Denethor knocks Pippin away, he falls onto the fire, and, in flames, runs out of the throne room and off the highest ledge of Minas Tirith, killing himself.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

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