Tolkien Gateway

Dimholt

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(Etymology)
 
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[[Image:Dimholt.jpg|thumb|250px|Dimholt from [[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]]]
 
[[Image:Dimholt.jpg|thumb|250px|Dimholt from [[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]]]
'''Dimholt''', was a fir-wood of dark trees at the entrance to the [[Dark Door]] within [[Dunharrow]].
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'''Dimholt''', was a small fir-wood of dark trees within [[Dunharrow]], outside the entrance to the [[Dark Door]].  
  
 
The Dimholt was traversed by a double row of standing stones that marked an ancient roadway leading away into the east, towards the [[Dwimorberg]] and the [[Paths of the Dead]]. Deep within a wood of black trees stood a single great stone to mark the way, and beyond that, among the roots of the Dwimorberg, lay the Dark Door of [[The Dead]].<ref>{{RK|V2}}</ref>
 
The Dimholt was traversed by a double row of standing stones that marked an ancient roadway leading away into the east, towards the [[Dwimorberg]] and the [[Paths of the Dead]]. Deep within a wood of black trees stood a single great stone to mark the way, and beyond that, among the roots of the Dwimorberg, lay the Dark Door of [[The Dead]].<ref>{{RK|V2}}</ref>

Latest revision as of 11:09, 31 January 2013

Dimholt, was a small fir-wood of dark trees within Dunharrow, outside the entrance to the Dark Door.

The Dimholt was traversed by a double row of standing stones that marked an ancient roadway leading away into the east, towards the Dwimorberg and the Paths of the Dead. Deep within a wood of black trees stood a single great stone to mark the way, and beyond that, among the roots of the Dwimorberg, lay the Dark Door of The Dead.[1]

[edit] Etymology

The word is supposed to be Rohirric and the element dim has the archaic sense "obscure, secret". Holt means "wood" in occasional poetic use (also seen in the name Everholt).[2]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Passing of the Grey Company"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 768