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Electronic Arts

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[[Image:Electronic Arts.jpg||thumb|175px|right|EA logo]]
 
'''Electronic Arts''' or '''EA''' for short is an American video games developing, publishing and distributing company, founded in [[1982]]. Among its successes are ''The Sims'', James Bond and various sports games, published by daughter company EA Sports.  
 
'''Electronic Arts''' or '''EA''' for short is an American video games developing, publishing and distributing company, founded in [[1982]]. Among its successes are ''The Sims'', James Bond and various sports games, published by daughter company EA Sports.  
  
==Early efforts==
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==History==
Electronic Arts had it first fantasy game with ''[[wikipedia:Bard's_Tale_(1985)|The Bard's Tale]]'' in [[1985]], and was introduced to the world of [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] in [[1990]], when they held the UK distribution of [[Interplay]]'s ''[[The Lord of the Rings: Volume 1]]''.
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===Early efforts===
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Electronic Arts had it first fantasy game with ''[[wikipedia:Bard's_Tale_(1985)|The Bard's Tale]]'' in [[1985]], and was introduced to the world of [[J.R.R. Tolkien|Tolkien]] in [[1990]], when they held the UK distribution of [[Interplay Productions|Interplay]]'s ''[[J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I (1990 video game)|The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I]]''.<ref>[http://www.lysator.liu.se/tolkien-games/entry/lotr1.html J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I] at Tolkien Games (retrieved 18 March 2011)</ref> In 1994 they published [[J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I (SNES)|The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I]] for the [[wikipedia:Super Nintendo Entertainment System|SNES]].<ref>[http://www.lysator.liu.se/tolkien-games/entry/lotr1-nintendo.html J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I] at Tolkien Games (retrieved 18 March 2011)</ref><ref>[http://www.mobygames.com/game/snes/jrr-tolkiens-lord-of-the-rings-volume-one J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I (retrieved 18 March 2011)</ref>
  
==Movie license==
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===Movie license===
Electronic Arts purchased the interactive entertainment rights of ''[[Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings]]'' in [[2002]]. That was after the video game ''[[Vivendi's The Fellowship of the Ring (game)|The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring]]'' by [[Vivendi]] came out, leading several people to believe that was an Electronic Arts game too. EA had to compress both the [[Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring|first]] and the [[Peter Jackson's The Two Towers|second]] film into one game, which became ''[[EA's The Two Towers|The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers]]'' in [[2002]]. A year later, a game based on the [[Peter Jackson's The Return of the King|third]] film was also made, ''[[EA's The Return of the King|The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]''. When all movie-based games were published, an "alternative [[Fellowship of the Ring|fellowship]]"- game, ''[[EA's The Third Age|The Lord of the Rings: The Third Age]]'', was made. Because it did not have rights to the book, it had to fill in the gameplay with movie-like aspects.  
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Electronic Arts purchased the interactive entertainment rights of [[The Lord of the Rings (film series)|''The Lord of the Rings'' (film series)]] in [[2002]]. That was after the video game ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (video game)|The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring]]'' by [[Vivendi]] came out, leading several people to believe that was an Electronic Arts game too. EA had to compress both the [[The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring|first]] and the [[The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers|second]] film into one game, which became ''[[EA's The Two Towers|The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers]]'' in [[2002]]. A year later, a game based on the [[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King|third]] film was also made, ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (video game)|The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King]]''. When all movie-based games were published, an "alternative [[Fellowship of the Ring|fellowship]]"- game, ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Third Age]]'', was made. Because it did not have rights to the book, it had to fill in the gameplay with movie-like aspects.  
  
==Book license==  
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===Book license===  
In [[2005]], a license to the books could be purchased from [[Saul Zaentz]], which led the way to ''[[EA's The Battle for Middle-earth|The Battle for Middle-earth]]'', ''[[EA's The Battle for Middle-earth II|The Battle for Middle-earth II]]'' and an expansion, ''[[EA's The Battle for Middle-earth II: The Rise of the Witch-king|The Rise of the Witch-king]]''. The popularity of these games made Electronic Arts to extend their license until [[2008]][http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=13313]. One more title was planned; at first, this would have been ''[[EA's The White Council]]'', but that has been cancelled. ''[[The Lord of the Rings: Conquest]]'' is expected to be published in the fall of [[2008]].  
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In [[2005]], a license to the books could be purchased from [[Saul Zaentz]], which led the way to ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth|The Battle for Middle-earth]]'', ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II|The Battle for Middle-earth II]]'' and an expansion, ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II: The Rise of the Witch-king|The Rise of the Witch-king]]''. The popularity of these games made Electronic Arts to extend their license until [[2008]].<ref>http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=13313</ref> One more title was planned; at first, this would have been ''[[The Lord of the Rings: The White Council]]'', but that has been cancelled. ''[[The Lord of the Rings: Conquest]]'' was published in January [[2009]].
  
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==Jackson==
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Despite borrowing music, character design and character voices from [[The Lord of the Rings (film series)|''The Lord of the Rings'' (film series)]], Electronic Arts did not leave room for [[Peter Jackson]]'s input. This did not sit well with Jackson, who turned to [[wikipedia:Ubisoft|Ubisoft]] for the film tie-in game of ''[[wikipedia:King Kong (2005 film)|King Kong]]''.<ref>http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/24/technology/24kong.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all</ref>
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
 
* [[:Category:EA Games|Games by EA]]
 
* [[:Category:EA Games|Games by EA]]
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* '''[http://www.ea.com Official website]'''
 
* '''[http://www.ea.com Official website]'''
 
** [http://www.ea.com/lordoftherings/index.jsp Lord of the Rings franchise page]
 
** [http://www.ea.com/lordoftherings/index.jsp Lord of the Rings franchise page]
* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EA Wikipedia profile]
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* {{WP|EA}}
[[Category:Companies]]
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{{references}}
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[[Category:Video Game developers]]
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[[Category:Video Game publishers]]
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[[Category:Businesses]]
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[[Category:American businesses]]

Latest revision as of 00:45, 2 May 2017

EA logo

Electronic Arts or EA for short is an American video games developing, publishing and distributing company, founded in 1982. Among its successes are The Sims, James Bond and various sports games, published by daughter company EA Sports.

Contents

[edit] History

[edit] Early efforts

Electronic Arts had it first fantasy game with The Bard's Tale in 1985, and was introduced to the world of Tolkien in 1990, when they held the UK distribution of Interplay's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I.[1] In 1994 they published The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I for the SNES.[2][3]

[edit] Movie license

Electronic Arts purchased the interactive entertainment rights of The Lord of the Rings (film series) in 2002. That was after the video game The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring by Vivendi came out, leading several people to believe that was an Electronic Arts game too. EA had to compress both the first and the second film into one game, which became The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers in 2002. A year later, a game based on the third film was also made, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. When all movie-based games were published, an "alternative fellowship"- game, The Lord of the Rings: The Third Age, was made. Because it did not have rights to the book, it had to fill in the gameplay with movie-like aspects.

[edit] Book license

In 2005, a license to the books could be purchased from Saul Zaentz, which led the way to The Battle for Middle-earth, The Battle for Middle-earth II and an expansion, The Rise of the Witch-king. The popularity of these games made Electronic Arts to extend their license until 2008.[4] One more title was planned; at first, this would have been The Lord of the Rings: The White Council, but that has been cancelled. The Lord of the Rings: Conquest was published in January 2009.

[edit] Jackson

Despite borrowing music, character design and character voices from The Lord of the Rings (film series), Electronic Arts did not leave room for Peter Jackson's input. This did not sit well with Jackson, who turned to Ubisoft for the film tie-in game of King Kong.[5]

[edit] See also

[edit] External links

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I at Tolkien Games (retrieved 18 March 2011)
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I at Tolkien Games (retrieved 18 March 2011)
  3. [http://www.mobygames.com/game/snes/jrr-tolkiens-lord-of-the-rings-volume-one J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I (retrieved 18 March 2011)
  4. http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?story=13313
  5. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/24/technology/24kong.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all