Tolkien Gateway

Naomi Mitchison

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| name=Naomi Mitchison
 
| born=[[1 November|November 1]], [[1897]]
 
| born=[[1 November|November 1]], [[1897]]
| died=[[January 11]], [[1999]]
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| died=[[11 January|January 11]], [[1999]]
 
| education=Oxford University
 
| education=Oxford University
 
| occupation=Novelist, poet
 
| occupation=Novelist, poet
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'''Naomi Mary Margaret Mitchison''' ([[1 November|November 1]], [[1897]] – [[January 11]], [[1999]]) was a Scottish novelist and poet.
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'''Naomi Mary Margaret Mitchison''' ([[1 November|November 1]], [[1897]] – [[11 January|January 11]], [[1999]]) was a Scottish novelist and poet.
  
 
==History==
 
==History==

Revision as of 16:52, 8 June 2011

Mitchison.jpg
Naomi Mitchison
Biographical information
BornNovember 1, 1897
DiedJanuary 11, 1999
EducationOxford University
OccupationNovelist, poet

Naomi Mary Margaret Mitchison (November 1, 1897January 11, 1999) was a Scottish novelist and poet.

Contents

History

Mitchison was educated in Oxford, and contributed verse to Oxford Poetry for 1915 and 1916 (in the former, in company with J.R.R. Tolkien's "Goblin Feet"). Eventually, she became a prolific writer of books and articles, including Graeme and the Dragon (1954, illustrated by Pauline Baynes) and To the Chapel Perilous (1955, which Tolkien disliked).[1]

For many years, Mitchison was a fan of Tolkien's works, and they had a long-time correspondance. She became a proofreader of The Lord of the Rings when George Allen & Unwin sent her advance proofs of the first two volumes. Of The Fellowship of the Ring, Mitchison wrote "It is timeless and will go on".[2]

However, later in life she became increasingly critical of Tolkien's works, critizing the "grandiose style" of The Return of the King and the lack of a feminine perspective in The Lord of the Rings and finding The Silmarillion simplistic.[1]

Bibliography, selected

Articles

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (2006), The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide: II. Reader's Guide, pp. 592-3
  2. Quoted by D.M.S. in "Recent Readings", in the journal English 1956, 11, p. 31