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The Fall of Arthur

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'''The Fall of Arthur''' the title of an unpublished poem by [[J.R.R. Tolkien]], concerned with the legend of [[King Arthur]].
 
'''The Fall of Arthur''' the title of an unpublished poem by [[J.R.R. Tolkien]], concerned with the legend of [[King Arthur]].
  
According to [[Humphrey Carpenter]], the poem "''has alliteration but no rhyme [and] did not touch on the Grail but began an individual rendering of the [[Wikipedia:Le Morte d'Arthur|Morte d'Arthur]], in which the king and Gawain go to war in 'Saxon lands' but are summoned home by news of Mordred's treachery''". "The Fall of Arthur" was read by E.V. Gordon and R.W. Chambers, who both approved of the poem.<ref name=Bio>[[Humphrey Carpenter]], ''[[J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography]]'', pp. 168-8 (1977 ed.; Carpenter also published some quotes from the poem)</ref><ref>[[Verlyn Flieger]], "Arthurian Romance", in ''[[J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: Scholarship and Critical Assessment]]'', pp. 34-5</ref>
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According to [[Humphrey Carpenter]], the poem "''has alliteration but no rhyme [and] did not touch on the Grail but began an individual rendering of the [[Wikipedia:Le Morte d'Arthur|Morte d'Arthur]], in which the king and Gawain go to war in 'Saxon lands' but are summoned home by news of Mordred's treachery''". "The Fall of Arthur" was read by [[E.V. Gordon]] and R.W. Chambers, who both approved of the poem.<ref name=Bio>[[Humphrey Carpenter]], ''[[J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography]]'', pp. 168-8 (1977 ed.; Carpenter also published some quotes from the poem)</ref><ref>[[Verlyn Flieger]], "Arthurian Romance", in ''[[J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: Scholarship and Critical Assessment]]'', pp. 34-5</ref>
  
 
The writing of the poem was abandoned in the mid 1930s,<ref name=Bio/> but in a 1955 letter to [[Houghton Mifflin]], his American publishers, Tolkien mentioned that he hoped to finish the "long poem".<ref>{{L|165}}</ref> Although the state of the manuscript(s) is unknown, there is a rumour that the poem has 954 lines.<ref>N.E. Brigand, [http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2011/03/lewiss-lost-aeneid.html#comments Comment to the blog post ”Lewis’s Lost Aeneid [Updated]]” (5 March 2011) at [http://lingwe.blogspot.com/ Lingwë] (accessed 8 March 2011)</ref>
 
The writing of the poem was abandoned in the mid 1930s,<ref name=Bio/> but in a 1955 letter to [[Houghton Mifflin]], his American publishers, Tolkien mentioned that he hoped to finish the "long poem".<ref>{{L|165}}</ref> Although the state of the manuscript(s) is unknown, there is a rumour that the poem has 954 lines.<ref>N.E. Brigand, [http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2011/03/lewiss-lost-aeneid.html#comments Comment to the blog post ”Lewis’s Lost Aeneid [Updated]]” (5 March 2011) at [http://lingwe.blogspot.com/ Lingwë] (accessed 8 March 2011)</ref>

Revision as of 19:07, 8 March 2011

File:Morte d'Arthur.jpg
Art inspired by Morte d'Arthur

The Fall of Arthur the title of an unpublished poem by J.R.R. Tolkien, concerned with the legend of King Arthur.

According to Humphrey Carpenter, the poem "has alliteration but no rhyme [and] did not touch on the Grail but began an individual rendering of the Morte d'Arthur, in which the king and Gawain go to war in 'Saxon lands' but are summoned home by news of Mordred's treachery". "The Fall of Arthur" was read by E.V. Gordon and R.W. Chambers, who both approved of the poem.[1][2]

The writing of the poem was abandoned in the mid 1930s,[1] but in a 1955 letter to Houghton Mifflin, his American publishers, Tolkien mentioned that he hoped to finish the "long poem".[3] Although the state of the manuscript(s) is unknown, there is a rumour that the poem has 954 lines.[4]

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Humphrey Carpenter, J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography, pp. 168-8 (1977 ed.; Carpenter also published some quotes from the poem)
  2. Verlyn Flieger, "Arthurian Romance", in J.R.R. Tolkien Encyclopedia: Scholarship and Critical Assessment, pp. 34-5
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 165, (undated, written June 1955)
  4. N.E. Brigand, Comment to the blog post ”Lewis’s Lost Aeneid [Updated]” (5 March 2011) at Lingwë (accessed 8 March 2011)