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Articles on ''The Lord of the Rings'' appeared regularly in the 1960s fanzine ''Niekas'', edited by [[Ed Meskys]].  The first organized Tolkien fan group was "The Fellowship of the Ring", founded by [[Ted Johnstone]] at Pittcon, the 1960 Worldcon.  They published four issues of the fanzine ''i-Palantir'' before the organization disbanded.
 
Articles on ''The Lord of the Rings'' appeared regularly in the 1960s fanzine ''Niekas'', edited by [[Ed Meskys]].  The first organized Tolkien fan group was "The Fellowship of the Ring", founded by [[Ted Johnstone]] at Pittcon, the 1960 Worldcon.  They published four issues of the fanzine ''i-Palantir'' before the organization disbanded.
  
The [[Tolkien Society of America]] first met "in February, 1965, beside the statue of Alma Mater on the Columbia University campus," according to a 1967 ''New York Times'' interview with [[Richard Plotz]], the Society's founder and first Thain.  By 1967, Meskys had become Thain and the society boasted over 1,000 members, primarily in the New York area, and was organized into local groups or ''smials'', a pattern that would be followed by other Tolkien fan organizations.  The society published a newsletter, ''Green Dragon'', and ''The Tolkien Journal'' (edited by Plotz).  In 1969, the society sponsored the first Tolkien Conference at [[wikipedia:Fort Belknap College|Fort Belknap College]].  The Tolkien Conference was not a "science fiction convention" but rather a scholarly event.
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The [[Tolkien Society of America]] first met "in February, 1965, beside the statue of Alma Mater on the Columbia University campus," according to a 1967 ''New York Times'' interview with [[Richard Plotz]], the Society's founder and first Thain.  By 1967, Meskys had become Thain and the society boasted over 1,000 members, primarily in the New York area, and was organized into local groups or ''smials'', a pattern that would be followed by other Tolkien fan organizations.  The society published a newsletter, ''Green Dragon'', and ''The Tolkien Journal'' (edited by Plotz).  In 1969, the society sponsored the first Tolkien Conference at [[Belknap College]].  The Tolkien Conference was not a "science fiction convention" but rather a scholarly event.
  
The [[University of Wisconsin Tolkien and Fantasy Society|University of Wisconsin Tolkien Society]] was founded in 1966, and is best know for its journal ''Orcrist'' (1966-1977), edited by [[Richard C. West]].
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The [[University of Wisconsin Tolkien Society]] was founded in 1966, and is best know for its journal ''Orcrist'' (1966-1977), edited by [[Richard C. West]].
  
 
Across the continent, [[Glen GoodKnight]] founded the [[Mythopoeic Society]] in California in 1967 for the study, discussion, and enjoyment of fantastic and mythic literature, especially the works of Tolkien and fellow-[[Inklings]] [[C.S. Lewis]], and [[Charles Williams]].  The society held its first Mythcon conference in [[1970]], which featured readings, a costume competition, an art show, and other events typical of science fiction conventions of the day.  The society's three current periodicals are ''Mythprint'', a monthly bulletin; ''Mythlore'', originally a fanzine and now a peer-reviewed journal that publishes scholarly articles on mythic and fantastic literature; and ''Mythic Circle'', a literary annual of original poetry and short stories (which replaced the Society's earlier publications ''Mythril'' and ''Mythellany'').   
 
Across the continent, [[Glen GoodKnight]] founded the [[Mythopoeic Society]] in California in 1967 for the study, discussion, and enjoyment of fantastic and mythic literature, especially the works of Tolkien and fellow-[[Inklings]] [[C.S. Lewis]], and [[Charles Williams]].  The society held its first Mythcon conference in [[1970]], which featured readings, a costume competition, an art show, and other events typical of science fiction conventions of the day.  The society's three current periodicals are ''Mythprint'', a monthly bulletin; ''Mythlore'', originally a fanzine and now a peer-reviewed journal that publishes scholarly articles on mythic and fantastic literature; and ''Mythic Circle'', a literary annual of original poetry and short stories (which replaced the Society's earlier publications ''Mythril'' and ''Mythellany'').   

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