Tolkien Gateway

Bucklebury

Bucklebury was the chief village of Buckland, lying in the shadow of Buck Hill, seat of the Master of Buckland. It was built about a mile east of the banks of the River Brandywine.[1]

The Bucklebury Ferry was a passage across the Brandywine between Bucklebury and the Marish.

[edit] Etymology

The name means Buck-burg, or Buck-town (buck always means male goat or deer).

Tolkien notes that it's "Bucklebury" rather than plain "Buckbury" because the word is either an alteration of earlier Bucken-bury (Bucken being archaic plural) or a reduction of Buckland.[2]

Based on this, David Salo has suggested that Bucklebury represents a possible Old Hobbitish form *Buccanburh "Bucca's burg".[3]

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "A Part of the Shire" map
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Nomenclature of The Lord of the Rings" in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 767
  3. David Salo, "Hobbitish Place-names" dated 23 November 1998, Elfling (accessed 21 September 2018)