Tolkien Gateway

Editing Ann-thennath

Warning: You are not logged in.

Your IP address will be recorded in this page's edit history.
The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 1: Line 1:
 
'''Ann-thennath''' ([[Sindarin]] ''[[and|ann]]'' = long, ''[[thenn]]'' = short, ''[[-ath]]'' = collective plural) was a song mode used in the [[Song of Beren and Lúthien]] as chanted by [[Strider]].  He stated that it was hard to render in the [[Common Speech]].<ref>{{FR|I11}}</ref>  
 
'''Ann-thennath''' ([[Sindarin]] ''[[and|ann]]'' = long, ''[[thenn]]'' = short, ''[[-ath]]'' = collective plural) was a song mode used in the [[Song of Beren and Lúthien]] as chanted by [[Strider]].  He stated that it was hard to render in the [[Common Speech]].<ref>{{FR|I11}}</ref>  
 
==Inspiration==
 
==Inspiration==
The English metric mode of ''Beren and Lúthien'' consists in a [[Wikipedia:Iambic tetrameter|iambic tetrameter]] (four pairs of ''unstressed and stressed'' syllable); in Classical Greek poetry however, the iambic tetrameter was originally 4 pairs of alternating ''short and long'' syllables, which is consistent to the meaning of the Sindarin term ("long-short"). This difference of terminology might account for Strider's adaptation/rendition from Sindarin (quantitative verse) to Westron (accentual-syllabic verse).
+
The English metric mode of ''Beren and Lúthien'' consists in a [[Wikipedia:Iambic tetrameter|iambic tetrameter]] (four pairs of ''unstressed and stressed'' syllable) with nine stanzas of eight lines each, rhymed ''ABAC, BABC''; in Classical Greek poetry however, the iambic tetrameter was originally 4 pairs of alternating ''short and long'' syllables, which is consistent to the meaning of the Sindarin term ("long-short").
  
[[Patrick Wynne]] and [[Carl F. Hostetter]] explain that the metric and rhyme of the English text tries to imitate what the ''ann-thennath'' would have been in the original Sindarin poem.<ref>[[Tolkien's Legendarium|''Tolkien's Legendarium: Essays on'' The History of Middle-earth]]: [[Patrick Wynne]] and [[Carl F. Hostetter]], "Three Elvish Verse Modes: ''Ann-thennath'', ''Minlamad thent'' / ''estent'', and ''Linnod''", pp. 113-120</ref>
+
Following Aragorn's words, [[Patrick Wynne]] and [[Carl F. Hostetter]] explain that the metric and rhyme of the English text tries to imitate what the ''ann-thennath'' would have been in the original Sindarin poem.<ref>[[Tolkien's Legendarium|''Tolkien's Legendarium: Essays on'' The History of Middle-earth]]: [[Patrick Wynne]] and [[Carl F. Hostetter]], "Three Elvish Verse Modes: ''Ann-thennath'', ''Minlamad thent'' / ''estent'', and ''Linnod''", pp. 113-120</ref>
  
 
{{references}}
 
{{references}}

Please note that all contributions to Tolkien Gateway are considered to be released under the GNU Free Documentation License (see Tolkien Gateway:Copyrights for details). If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly and redistributed at will, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource. Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)

Templates used on this page: