Tolkien Gateway

Brethil

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| othernames=''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin''
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| othernames=''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin'' ([[Sindarin|S]])
 
| location=Between [[Taeglin]] and [[Sirion]], [[West Beleriand]]
 
| location=Between [[Taeglin]] and [[Sirion]], [[West Beleriand]]
 
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'''Brethil''', later called '''''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin''''', was a forest between the [[Taeglin]] and the [[Sirion]], originally part of [[Doriath]] but outside the [[Girdle of Melian]]. The main feature of the forest was the hill of [[Amon Obel]].
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'''Brethil''' or the '''Forest of Brethil''', was a forest between the rivers [[Taeglin]] and [[Sirion]]. Originally part of [[Doriath]], but outside the [[Girdle of Melian]], the land was later granted to the [[Haladin]]. After the death of [[Túrin]] and [[Nienor]], it was given another name, '''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin''' ("Grave of the Children of Húrin"). The main feature of the forest was the hill of [[Amon Obel]].
  
 
==History==
 
==History==
After dwelling east of the river [[Gelion]], the [[Men]] of the [[House of Haleth]] were granted Brethil by King [[Thingol]], on the condition that they guard the [[Crossings of the Taeglin]].<ref>{{S|West}}</ref> Some [[Drúedain]] also dwelt there.<ref>{{UT|Druedain}}</ref> The main settlement of the Haladin was [[Ephel Brandir]] on Amon Obel.  
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===Early history===
[[File:Ted Nasmith - The Orc-Host is Ambushed in Brethil.jpg|250px|left|thumb|''The Orc-Host is Ambushed in Brethil'' by [[Ted Nasmith]]]]
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After dwelling in [[Thargelion]] for some time, the [[Haladin]] and their leader [[Haleth]], journeyed westward and entered the Forest of Brethil. Brethil was claimed by King Thingol to be part of his realm, but after learning of the travails of Haleth and her people they were granted the land to dwell in, on the condition that they guard the [[Crossings of the Taeglin]].<ref>{{S|West}}</ref> Some [[Drúedain]] also dwelt there.<ref>{{UT|Druedain}}</ref> The main settlement of the Haladin was [[Ephel Brandir]] on Amon Obel.
The [[Men of Brethil]] for a century protected [[Nargothrond]] and also took part in the [[Nirnaeth Arnoediad]], where they were all slain. Their [[Chieftain of the Haladin|Chieftain]] [[Handir]] was slain by Orcs north of Brethil on {{FA|495}}.<ref name=T>{{S|Turin}}</ref>
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[[File:Ted Nasmith - The Orc-Host is Ambushed in Brethil.jpg|250px|right|thumb|''The Orc-Host is Ambushed in Brethil'' by [[Ted Nasmith]]]]
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[[Dorthonion]] was ruined after the [[Dagor Bragollach]]. [[Emeldir]], the wife of [[Barahir]], led the surviving women and children into Brethil, where they were received by the Haladin. Two years after the battle, [[Minas Tirith (Beleriand)|Minas Tirith]] was captured by [[Gorthaur]] and Brethil was now open to invading Orcs. [[Halmir]] and [[Beleg]] led a force of Men and Sindar and ambushed an Orc-legion that was marching through Brethil and utterly destroyed them.<ref>{{S|18}}</ref>
  
Túrin came here after the destruction of [[Nargothrond]] and the journey to [[Dor-Lómin]], and rested here for a while, until rumours came again about [[Glaurung]], the father of all dragons. At the borders of this forest Glaurung was slain by Túrin.<ref name=T/>
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In {{FA|495}}, Orcs invaded Brethil. [[Handir]] was slain and the [[Men of Brethil]] were driven back into their woods.<ref name=T>{{S|Turin}}</ref>
  
After the death of the [[Dragons|dragon]] [[Glaurung]] his slayer Túrin wrenched his sword [[Gurthang]] from the belly of the beast. This action caused a spurt of black venomous blood to drench Túrin's hand. The pain of his burned hand and a baleful glare by the dragon caused Túrin to swoon and appear as if dead. Soon after [[Nienor]], still under the dragon's curse and unaware of her true name, came to the scene and bound her husband Túrin's hand. She cried for him to awake but this only aroused Glaurung one last time. He hailed her by her true name and as he died she recalled all of her past. Niënor was horrified when she learned that the child whom she carried within her womb was her brother's child. Brandir witnessed the scene and cried out to Niënor, but she fled and jumped to her death at the [[Cabed-en-Aras]]. When Brandir walked back to [[Nen Girith]] where the people of Brethil cowered he spoke of the deaths of the children of Húrin and renamed the land, stating that it would never be free of grief.<ref>{{CH|17}}</ref>
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===Túrin in Brethil===
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[[File:Alan Lee - The Coming of Túrin into Brethil.jpg|250px|right|thumb|''The Coming of Túrin into Brethil'' by [[Alan Lee]]]]
 +
[[Túrin]] came to Brethil after the destruction of [[Nargothrond]] and the journey to [[Dor-Lómin]]. In Brethil he searched for [[Finduilas]], but his search was in vain as the Men of Brethil told him that she was dead after they defeated the Orc-host from Nargothrond at the Crossings of Taeglin. Túrin began to live with the woodmen under the name Turambar.<ref name=T/>
 +
 
 +
After hearing some rumours of Orcs roaming near the Crossings, Túrin went there and found [[Nienor]] lying upon [[Haudh-en-Elleth]]. Túrin brought her back to Ephel Brandir where she recovered, though because of her earlier encounter with [[Glaurung]], the father of all dragons, she could not remember her name or past. Túrin named her Níniel and they grew to love each other, eventually marrying and conceiving a child.<ref name=T/>
 +
 
 +
Brethil was at peace for some years until Glaurung sent Orcs to trouble the woodmen. Túrin took up [[Gurthang]] again and the Orcs were repelled. The sight of the Black Sword being seen again was reported to Glaurung and he came forth from Nargothrond towards Brethil. At the borders of the forest Glaurung was slain by Túrin.<ref name=T/>
 +
 
 +
After the death of the [[Dragons|dragon]] Glaurung, Túrin wrenched Gurthang from the belly of the beast. This action caused a spurt of black venomous blood to drench Túrin's hand. The pain of his burned hand and a baleful glare by the dragon caused Túrin to swoon and appear as if dead. Soon after Nienor, still under the dragon's curse and unaware of her true name, came to the scene and bound her husband Túrin's hand. She cried for him to awake but this only aroused Glaurung one last time. He hailed her by her true name and as he died she recalled all of her past. Niënor was horrified when she learned that the child whom she carried within her womb was her brother's child. Brandir witnessed the scene and cried out to Niënor, but she fled and jumped to her death at [[Cabed-en-Aras]]. When Brandir walked back to [[Nen Girith]], where the people of Brethil cowered, he spoke of the deaths of the children of Húrin and called the land ''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin'', ‘Grave of the Children of Húrin’, stating that it would never be free of grief.<ref>{{CH|17}}, p. 247</ref>
 +
 
 +
When Túrin awoke he went to Nen Girith and Brandir told him Nienor was dead and that she was his sister. Túrin did not believe him, so he slew him and fled the scene. Near the Crossings he met [[Mablung]] and his entourage. The elf told him of what had become of his mother and sister and their encounter with Glaurung. Túrin horrified by what he learnt fled to Cabed-en-Aras and cast himself upon Gurthang. The Men of Brethil and the Elves came to the gorge and buried Túrin.<ref>{{CH|18}}, pp. 252-7</ref>
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 +
===Húrin in Brethil===
 +
[[Húrin]] travelled to Brethil after his journey to Hithlum. He visited the grave of Túrin and Nienor and by the stone he found his wife [[Morwen]] who died shortly after.<ref>{{CH|18}}, pp. 258-9</ref> Húrin was taken to Ephel Brandir where he caused infighting amongst the Men of Brethil.<ref>{{WJ|P3}}, pp. 291-5</ref>
  
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
{{Pronounce|Brethil.mp3|Ardamir}}
 
{{Pronounce|Brethil.mp3|Ardamir}}
''[[brethil (Sindarin word)|brethil]]'' is [[Sindarin]] for  "silver birch".<ref>{{S|Appendix}}</ref>
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''[[brethil (Sindarin word)|brethil]]'' is [[Sindarin]] for  "silver birch".<ref>{{S|Appendix}}, entry ''[[brethil (Sindarin word)|brethil]]''</ref>
  
 
''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin'' was the name that [[Brandir]] gave to Brethil, meaning "Grave of the Children of [[Húrin]]".
 
''Sarch nia Chîn Húrin'' was the name that [[Brandir]] gave to Brethil, meaning "Grave of the Children of [[Húrin]]".

Latest revision as of 18:47, 5 April 2021

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Brethil
Forest
Christopher Tolkien - Map of Brethil.jpg
General Information
Other namesSarch nia Chîn Húrin (S)
LocationBetween Taeglin and Sirion, West Beleriand
TypeForest
DescriptionForest of silver birches, with Amon Obel at the centre
Major townsEphel Brandir
InhabitantsHaladin, Sindar, Drúedain
GalleryImages of Brethil

Brethil or the Forest of Brethil, was a forest between the rivers Taeglin and Sirion. Originally part of Doriath, but outside the Girdle of Melian, the land was later granted to the Haladin. After the death of Túrin and Nienor, it was given another name, Sarch nia Chîn Húrin ("Grave of the Children of Húrin"). The main feature of the forest was the hill of Amon Obel.

Contents

[edit] History

[edit] Early history

After dwelling in Thargelion for some time, the Haladin and their leader Haleth, journeyed westward and entered the Forest of Brethil. Brethil was claimed by King Thingol to be part of his realm, but after learning of the travails of Haleth and her people they were granted the land to dwell in, on the condition that they guard the Crossings of the Taeglin.[1] Some Drúedain also dwelt there.[2] The main settlement of the Haladin was Ephel Brandir on Amon Obel.

The Orc-Host is Ambushed in Brethil by Ted Nasmith

Dorthonion was ruined after the Dagor Bragollach. Emeldir, the wife of Barahir, led the surviving women and children into Brethil, where they were received by the Haladin. Two years after the battle, Minas Tirith was captured by Gorthaur and Brethil was now open to invading Orcs. Halmir and Beleg led a force of Men and Sindar and ambushed an Orc-legion that was marching through Brethil and utterly destroyed them.[3]

In F.A. 495, Orcs invaded Brethil. Handir was slain and the Men of Brethil were driven back into their woods.[4]

[edit] Túrin in Brethil

The Coming of Túrin into Brethil by Alan Lee

Túrin came to Brethil after the destruction of Nargothrond and the journey to Dor-Lómin. In Brethil he searched for Finduilas, but his search was in vain as the Men of Brethil told him that she was dead after they defeated the Orc-host from Nargothrond at the Crossings of Taeglin. Túrin began to live with the woodmen under the name Turambar.[4]

After hearing some rumours of Orcs roaming near the Crossings, Túrin went there and found Nienor lying upon Haudh-en-Elleth. Túrin brought her back to Ephel Brandir where she recovered, though because of her earlier encounter with Glaurung, the father of all dragons, she could not remember her name or past. Túrin named her Níniel and they grew to love each other, eventually marrying and conceiving a child.[4]

Brethil was at peace for some years until Glaurung sent Orcs to trouble the woodmen. Túrin took up Gurthang again and the Orcs were repelled. The sight of the Black Sword being seen again was reported to Glaurung and he came forth from Nargothrond towards Brethil. At the borders of the forest Glaurung was slain by Túrin.[4]

After the death of the dragon Glaurung, Túrin wrenched Gurthang from the belly of the beast. This action caused a spurt of black venomous blood to drench Túrin's hand. The pain of his burned hand and a baleful glare by the dragon caused Túrin to swoon and appear as if dead. Soon after Nienor, still under the dragon's curse and unaware of her true name, came to the scene and bound her husband Túrin's hand. She cried for him to awake but this only aroused Glaurung one last time. He hailed her by her true name and as he died she recalled all of her past. Niënor was horrified when she learned that the child whom she carried within her womb was her brother's child. Brandir witnessed the scene and cried out to Niënor, but she fled and jumped to her death at Cabed-en-Aras. When Brandir walked back to Nen Girith, where the people of Brethil cowered, he spoke of the deaths of the children of Húrin and called the land Sarch nia Chîn Húrin, ‘Grave of the Children of Húrin’, stating that it would never be free of grief.[5]

When Túrin awoke he went to Nen Girith and Brandir told him Nienor was dead and that she was his sister. Túrin did not believe him, so he slew him and fled the scene. Near the Crossings he met Mablung and his entourage. The elf told him of what had become of his mother and sister and their encounter with Glaurung. Túrin horrified by what he learnt fled to Cabed-en-Aras and cast himself upon Gurthang. The Men of Brethil and the Elves came to the gorge and buried Túrin.[6]

[edit] Húrin in Brethil

Húrin travelled to Brethil after his journey to Hithlum. He visited the grave of Túrin and Nienor and by the stone he found his wife Morwen who died shortly after.[7] Húrin was taken to Ephel Brandir where he caused infighting amongst the Men of Brethil.[8]

[edit] Etymology

brethil is Sindarin for "silver birch".[9]

Sarch nia Chîn Húrin was the name that Brandir gave to Brethil, meaning "Grave of the Children of Húrin".

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Coming of Men into the West"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The Drúedain"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Ruin of Beleriand and the Fall of Fingolfin"
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Túrin Turambar"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Death of Glaurung", p. 247
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Death of Túrin", pp. 252-7
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Children of Húrin, "The Death of Túrin", pp. 258-9
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Three. The Wanderings of Húrin and Other Writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion", pp. 291-5
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Appendix: Elements in Quenya and Sindarin Names", entry brethil