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Meduseld

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[[Image:Brothers Hildebrandt - The Golden Hall of Rohan.jpg|thumb|250px|''The Golden Hall of Rohan'' by [[Brothers Hildebrandt]]]]
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'''Meduseld''' was the great '''Golden Hall''' built in [[Edoras]].
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{{location
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| image=[[File:Jef Murray - Meduseld.jpg|250px]]
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| name=Meduseld
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| othernames=
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| etymology=''Mead Hall'' ([[Old English]])
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| type=Hall
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| location=The summit of [[Edoras]]
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| inhabitants=[[Rohirrim]]
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| realms=[[Rohan]]
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| description=A great "golden hall" (topped with straw roof, which made it appear golden from afar) upon a green terrace
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| events=[[Wulf]]'s rebellion ({{TA|2759}})
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| references=
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|}}
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'''Meduseld''' was the great '''Golden Hall''' that stood upon a green terrace in [[Edoras]]. It was topped with a straw roof, which made it appear as if it was made out of gold when seen from far off. Its walls were richly decorated with tapestries depicting the history and legends of the [[Rohirrim]], and it served as a house for the King and his kin, a meeting hall for the King and his advisers, and a feast hall.<ref>{{TT|III6}}</ref>
  
After the [[Éothéod]] had settled in [[Rohan]], the [[Kings of Rohan|Second King of Rohan]], [[Brego]] son of [[Eorl]], began building a great hall on top of the hill of Edoras.
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==History==
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After the [[Éothéod]] had settled in [[Rohan]], the [[Kings of Rohan|Second King of Rohan]], [[Brego]] son of [[Eorl]], built a great hall on top of the hill of Edoras. The hall was completed in {{TA|2569}}.<ref>{{App|TA}}</ref>
  
Meduseld was a large hall with a straw roof, which made it appear as if it was made out of gold when seen from far off. Its walls were richly decorated with tapestries depicting the history and legends of the [[Rohirrim]], and it served as a house for the King and his kin, a meeting hall for the King and his advisors, and a feast hall.
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In {{TA|2758|n}} the [[Dunlendings|Dunlending]] leader, [[Wulf]], took Edoras and Meduseld and proclaimed himself king. [[Helm Hammerhand]]'s son [[Haleth (son of Helm)|Haleth]] fell defending the doors of the great hall.  Wulf was eventually overthrown by [[Fréaláf]], son of [[Hild]], in {{TA|2759|n}}.<ref>{{App|Eorl}}</ref>
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In the late [[Third Age]], Meduseld was the home of  King [[Théoden]].<ref>{{TT|III2}}</ref>  On [[7 August]] {{TA|3019}} Théoden's body was brought to Meduseld<ref>{{RK|VI6}}</ref> where he lay until his funeral three days later.<ref>{{App|Chief}}</ref>
  
In the late [[Third Age]], Meduseld was the home of  King [[Théoden]].
 
 
==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
The word ''Meduseld'', in the [[Old English]], means "Mead Hall" having a connotation of "Hall of feasts"; ''medu'' means "mead" but as a word it has connotations to "joy".  
 
The word ''Meduseld'', in the [[Old English]], means "Mead Hall" having a connotation of "Hall of feasts"; ''medu'' means "mead" but as a word it has connotations to "joy".  
  
 
==Inspiration==
 
==Inspiration==
In many ways Meduseld is inspired by Anglo-Saxon poetry, particularly [[Beowulf]], which contains the mead-hall Heorot. The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.
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In many ways Meduseld is inspired by [[Old English|Anglo-Saxon]] poetry, particularly ''[[Beowulf (poem)|Beowulf]]'', which contains the mead-hall [[Wikipedia:Heorot|Heorot]] — the "golden hall" of King [[Wikipedia:Hrothgar|Hrothgar]].<ref>{{webcite|author=[[John Garth]]|articleurl=http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/2014/05/j-r-r-tolkien-beowulf-one-mans-passion-threshold-between-myth-and-reality|articlename=J R R Tolkien's Beowulf: one man's passion for the threshold between myth and reality|dated=29 May 2014|website=[http://www.newstatesman.com/ newstatesman.com]|accessed=29 May 2014}}</ref> The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.
  
[[Category:Rohan]]
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{{references}}
 
[[Category:Buildings]]
 
[[Category:Buildings]]
 
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[[Category:Old English names]]
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[[Category:Rohan]]
 
[[de:Meduseld]]
 
[[de:Meduseld]]
 
[[fi:Meduseld]]
 
[[fi:Meduseld]]
 
[[fr:encyclo/geographie/villes_tours_et_forteresses/rohan/meduseld]]
 
[[fr:encyclo/geographie/villes_tours_et_forteresses/rohan/meduseld]]

Latest revision as of 22:52, 26 October 2016

Jef Murray - Meduseld.jpg
Meduseld
Physical Description
TypeHall
LocationThe summit of Edoras
RealmsRohan
InhabitantsRohirrim
DescriptionA great "golden hall" (topped with straw roof, which made it appear golden from afar) upon a green terrace
General Information
EtymologyMead Hall (Old English)
EventsWulf's rebellion (T.A. 2759)

Meduseld was the great Golden Hall that stood upon a green terrace in Edoras. It was topped with a straw roof, which made it appear as if it was made out of gold when seen from far off. Its walls were richly decorated with tapestries depicting the history and legends of the Rohirrim, and it served as a house for the King and his kin, a meeting hall for the King and his advisers, and a feast hall.[1]

[edit] History

After the Éothéod had settled in Rohan, the Second King of Rohan, Brego son of Eorl, built a great hall on top of the hill of Edoras. The hall was completed in T.A. 2569.[2]

In 2758 the Dunlending leader, Wulf, took Edoras and Meduseld and proclaimed himself king. Helm Hammerhand's son Haleth fell defending the doors of the great hall. Wulf was eventually overthrown by Fréaláf, son of Hild, in 2759.[3]

In the late Third Age, Meduseld was the home of King Théoden.[4] On 7 August T.A. 3019 Théoden's body was brought to Meduseld[5] where he lay until his funeral three days later.[6]

[edit] Etymology

The word Meduseld, in the Old English, means "Mead Hall" having a connotation of "Hall of feasts"; medu means "mead" but as a word it has connotations to "joy".

[edit] Inspiration

In many ways Meduseld is inspired by Anglo-Saxon poetry, particularly Beowulf, which contains the mead-hall Heorot — the "golden hall" of King Hrothgar.[7] The description of "the light of it shines far across the land" is one of the lines from this poem.

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The King of the Golden Hall"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Third Age"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The House of Eorl"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Riders of Rohan"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "Many Partings"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Chief Days from the Fall of Barad-dûr to the End of the Third Age"
  7. John Garth, "J R R Tolkien's Beowulf: one man's passion for the threshold between myth and reality" dated 29 May 2014, newstatesman.com (accessed 29 May 2014)