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Dor-en-Ernil

Steamey - Imrazôr and Mithrellas

Dor-en-Ernil was a coastland region of southern Gondor.[1] Its name is Sindarin for "Land of the Prince", a reference to the Princes of Dol Amroth.

Contents

[edit] Geography

Though its boundaries are not clearly established, it appears to have been part of - or perhaps synonymous with - the mountainous coastland fief known as Belfalas. Extending out from its western shores was smaller peninsula on which was built Dol Amroth, the seat of the Princes of Dol Amroth in the later Third Age.

[edit] History

In the late First Age, Sindar refugees from Beleriand[2] settled the area and established an Elven settlement about 50 miles north of the later-named Dol Amroth, at Edhellond[3]

A family of Faithful from Númenor had ruled over the land of Belfalas since the Second Age. This family of Númenóreans were akin to the Lords of Andúnië, and thus related to Elendil and descended from the House of Elros.[4] After the Downfall of Númenor they had been given the title Prince of Belfalas by Elendil[5] and their land, now a fief of Gondor, was called Dor-en-Ernil. He granted this family a noble title, making them the hereditary Princes of Belfalas.

Amroth, King of Lórien from the beginning of the Third Age,[6] left his realm behind in T.A. 1981 in search of his beloved Nimrodel, who had fled from the horror unleashed by the Dwarves in Moria, along with numerous Galadhrim. He waited for her at Edhellond, for their final voyage together into the West. But Nimrodel, who loved Middle-earth as much as she did Amroth, failed to join him. When the ship was blown prematurely out to sea, he jumped overboard in a futile attempt to reach the shore to search for her, and drowned in the bay.[7] When Amroth was lost at sea in T.A. 1981 the last of these Elves left the region.[8]

It was from the name of this king that Dol Amroth (the "Hill of Amroth") took its name. The first Prince of Dol Amroth was Galador, the son of Imrazôr. According to legend, Imrazôr had married the Elven-lady Mithrellas, a companion of Nimrodel.[9]

During the War of the Ring, the nearby city of Linhir was attacked by the Corsairs of Umbar and the Haradrim and Men of Lamedon under Angbor tried to keep them off, until the Grey Company with the wraiths of the Oathbreakers arrived and ended the conflict.[10]

[edit] Etymology

Dor-en-Ernil consists of the Sindarin words dor "land" + en "of" + ernil "prince".[11]

[edit] Other versions of the Legendarium

Christopher Tolkien notes that the name appears only in the Map of Rohan, Gondor, and Mordor, the label being on the east of an unnamed hillrange.[12] The name doesn't appear in the general Map of Middle-earth. For the newer map for the Unfinished Tales, C. Tolkien put the label on the same location, but among the wider context.[13]

C. Tolkien notes that while, in the original map, the label was put between the hilrange and Gilrain to the east, the name betrayed a connection to the Princes[12] and thus the name would refer to the wider area that included Dol Amroth, farther to the west.

[edit] Portrayal in adaptations

2014: The Lord of the Rings Online:

Dor-en-Ernil was an area in the region of Central Gondor, located south of the Ringló Vale and west of Lower Lebennin. During the War of the Ring, it was attacked by Corsairs of Umbar and Haradrim. The fishing village of "Gaerlond" and the inland village of "Tungobel" were both burned, the lighthouse of "Barad Rill" was toppled, and the beacon "Dol Brannor" was seized by the Enemy. The river Gilrain and the city of Linhir formed the eastern border. The hills to the west, between Dor-en-Ernil and the Havens of Belfalas were mostly inaccessible but were identified in dialogue as the "Emyn Ernil".

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "Map of Rohan, Gondor, and Mordor"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Amroth and Nimrodel", p. 247
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", note 18, p. 255
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan", Note 39
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", p. 243-44.
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", p. 240-242, 245.
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Third Age"
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan", Note 39, p. 316
  10. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Return of the King, "The Last Debate"
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, "The Rivers and Beacon-hills of Gondor" (edited by Carl F. Hostetter), in Vinyar Tengwar, Number 42, July 2001, p. 12
  12. 12.0 12.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The History of Galadriel and Celeborn", "Amroth and Nimrodel", note 14
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The West of Middle-earth at the End of the Third Age" [map]