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Elves of Mithrim

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The name Mithrim refers to more than one character, item or concept. For a list of other meanings, see Mithrim (disambiguation).

The Elves of Mithrim were the Sindarin inhabitants of the land of Mithrim.

The Elves of Mithrim crossed into Hithlum from Beleriand at some time before the rising of the Sun, settling in the regions around Lake Mithrim.[1] They were the first Elves of Middle-earth encountered by the Noldor upon their return from Aman.[2] Fingolfin took up lordship in Hithlum, with most of his own people dwelling around the shores of Lake Mithrim,[3] and there was presumably a degree of intermingling between the two peoples. It is not stated to what extent the Grey-elves of Mithrim participated in the Wars of Beleriand under Fingolfin and Fingon. After the Nirnaeth Arnoediad they sheltered Rían;[4] when she departed Hithlum, one of the Elves, Annael, fostered her son Tuor.[5]

[edit] Language

The Elves of Mithrim spoke a marked dialect of Sindarin.[6]

[edit] Etymology

Mithrim has two alternate etymologies. In the earlier version, Mithrim was Noldorin in origin, including the roots mith- "fog, misty, grey" and -rhim(b) "cold" or "cold lake".[7]


A later version is that Mithrim "grey folk" was applied by the Sindar of Beleriand to their kindred who had gone north into Hithlum. The climate north of Ered Wethrin was cool, misty, and grey, but the Elves also wove a grey cloth that aided in their concealment. It is also suggested that the Noldor first used the term Sindar (or Sindeldi) to refer to the Elves of Mithrim, later applying it to all the Sindarin-speaking Elves of Beleriand.[6]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Four. Quendi and Eldar: B. Meanings and use of the various terms applied to the Elves and their varieties in Quenya, Telerin, and Sindarin"
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of the Return of the Noldor"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Beleriand and its Realms"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Túrin Turambar"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Silmarillion, "Quenta Silmarillion: Of Tuor and the Fall of Gondolin"
  6. 6.0 6.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The War of the Jewels, "Part Four. Quendi and Eldar: Author's Notes to Quendi and Eldar"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies"