Tolkien Gateway

Entwives

"I shan't call it the end, till we've cleared up the mess." — Sam
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Farewell to Fangorn by Luca Bonatti

Entwives were the mates of the Ents. The Entwives were dedicated to Yavanna.[1] They had gardens in the regions later known as the Brown Lands and had taught agriculture to Men and Hobbits.

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[edit] History

During the First or the Second Age they started to move farther away from the male Ents because they liked to plant and control small things like vegetables, grass and flowers while the male Ents tended the larger trees of the great forest. The Entwives passed the Anduin and went to the region that would later become the Brown Lands. After Morgoth was overthrown, their gardens blossomed and they taught agriculture to the primitive Men and they honored them.[2]

When Sauron burned that region to stop the advance of the Last Alliance down the Anduin, the Entwives were either destroyed, or escaped into the wilds of Middle-earth and were lost to the Ents (or so the Ents themselves believed). Some of those who fled to the East were probably enslaved as farmers to feed the armies of the Men of Darkness.[3]

Treebeard would tell Merry and Pippin that the Entwives would love their country. Indeed sometime before the War of the Ring, Halfast Gamgee claimed that he saw an elm-like "Tree-Man" walking in the North Moors.[4] However, it was never learned whether the "Tree-Man" was an Ent, an Entwife, or just a story.

[edit] Background

One of the primary daggers on the survival of the Entwives is found in Letter 144 of The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien:

"I think that in fact the Entwives had disappeared for good, being destroyed with their gardens in the War of the Last Alliance (Second Age 34293441) when Sauron pursued a scorched earth policy and burned their land against the advance of the Allies down the Anduin..."
Letter 144

In 2017, a Quora user named Pip Willis published a partial image of a map he claimed his father drew and shared with J.R.R. Tolkien in 1971. Willis alleges that Tolkien wrote on the map "Here may be Entwives", in an area on the east bank a southern bow of the river Carnen, flowing into the Sea of Rhûn.[5][6]

[edit] See also

[edit] External Links

References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 247, (dated 20 September 1963)
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "Treebeard"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien; Humphrey Carpenter, Christopher Tolkien (eds.), The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter 144, (dated 25 April 1954)
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Shadow of the Past"
  5. Pip Willis, "After Lord of the Rings was there any mention of the entwives?" dated 22 May 2017, quora.com (accessed 7 June 2017)
  6. Michael Martinez, "Yes, but is it canon?" dated 24 May 2017, The Tolkien Society (accessed 7 June 2017)