Tolkien Gateway

Emyn Muil

Ted Nasmith - No Way Down.jpg
Emyn Muil
Physical Description
TypeRange of hills
LocationSouth of the Brown Lands, north of Nindalf
RealmsGondor
Reunited Kingdom
InhabitantsNone
DescriptionA treacherous labyrinth of hills
General Information
EventsBreaking of the Fellowship

Emyn Muil was a range of hills south of the Brown Lands and north of the Nindalf. The Anduin cut through the hills and then pooled in Nen Hithoel.[1] The Fellowship of the Ring rode boats through Emyn Muil[2] before the group broke up near the southern boundary of the hills.[3] Afterwards Frodo and Sam hiked through the difficult terrain east of the river and met Gollum just below the eastern edge of the Emyn Muil.[4]

Contents

[edit] Geography

The hills rose gradually in the north with great brakes thorn and sloe, brambles and creepers. Near the river ivy clung to grey stone chimneys and further ridges were topped with firs twisted by wind.[2] On three sides Emyn Muil ended in cliffs: In the west the uplands ended abruptly in the East Wall of Rohan.[5] In the south the Anduin cascaded over Rauros, a great waterfall.[6] In the east, although of lower elevation, the barren hills still ended in a steep edge.[4]

The Anduin cut through the hills on its southward course. In the north the river narrowed and passed through Sarn Gebir. No boats could survive these rapids and travelers had to use a portage way on the west bank. South of Sarn Gebir the river plunged between towering cliffs until it passed between the two great statues of the Argonath. A little further and the pent waters opened into a long oval lake called Nen Hithoel. On the southern end of the lake were three peaks: Amon Lhaw on the east bank, Tol Brandir amid two arms of the river, and Amon Hen on the western side. At the foot of Amon Hen was a green clearing, Parth Galen, and south of it was the North Stair that allowed for passage to the bottom of Rauros and Emyn Muil.[2]

[edit] History

After Prince Minalcar of Gondor had defeated a large army of Easterlings in T.A. 1248 (and took the name Rómendacil) he fortified the west bank of the Anduin and built the pillars of the Argonath in the Emyn Muil.[7]

In 2510, the Steward Cirion bequeathed the land of Calenardhon to Eorl the Young. After pledging the Oath of Eorl the bounds of the new realm of Rohan were determined; in the east these were the Anduin and the west-cliff of the Emyn Muil.[8]

In 3002 Orc raiders battled with some Rohirrim, and Éomund was slain there.[9]

Aragorn captured Gollum on 1 February,[10] 3017 in the Dead Marshes.[11] To avoid detection by the spies of Sauron, Aragorn drove his captive through the northern Emyn Muil before crossing the Anduin.[10]

In T.A. 3019 the Fellowship of the Ring encountered the Emyn Muil. The following list of dates show what events took place in the hilly region:[12]

[edit] Etymology

Emyn Muil is a Sindarin name meaning "the drear hills";[13] the word emyn is the plural form of amon ("hill").[14]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The West of Middle-earth at the End of the Third Age" [map]
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Great River"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "The Breaking of the Fellowship"
  4. 4.0 4.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Taming of Sméagol"
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Two Towers, "The Riders of Rohan"
  6. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, The Fellowship of the Ring, "Farewell to Lórien"
  7. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The Númenorean Kings", "Gondor and the Heirs of Anárion"
  8. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "Cirion and Eorl and the Friendship of Gondor and Rohan", (iii) Cirion and Eorl
  9. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix A, "The House of Eorl"
  10. 10.0 10.1 J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, "The Hunt for the Ring", (ii) Other Versions of the Story
  11. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Third Age"
  12. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings, Appendix B, "The Great Years"
  13. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), Unfinished Tales, Index
  14. J.R.R. Tolkien, "Unfinished index for The Lord of the Rings", in Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull (eds), The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion, p. 334