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Ilurambar

"They are as ice and glass and steel, being above all imagination of the Children of Earth cold, transparent, and hard. They cannot be seen, nor can they be passed, save by the Door of Night."
Rúmil of Tirion, The Ambarkanta[1]

Ilurambar (Q, pron. [ˌiluˈrambar]) is a term mentioned in The Book of Lost Tales Part One and is a Qenya name for the Walls of the World.[2] Earlier it was called the Wall of Things.[3]

According to the Ambarkanta, the Walls are a shell that fence Vaiya and the world from emptiness and darkness (the Void). The World and all its airs are globed inside them. They are totally impervious and their only opening is the Door of Night which is guarded by Earendil.[4]

[edit] Etymology

Ilurambar derives from ilu- meaning "universe"[5] and rambar (plural of ramba) meaning "walls".[6]

[edit] References

  1. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Shaping of Middle-earth, "V. The Ambarkanta: Of the Fashion of the World" p. 235
  2. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "The Hiding of Valinor"
  3. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Book of Lost Tales Part One, "The Coming of the Valar and the Building of Valinor": "Notes and Commentary"
  4. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", entry IL-
  5. J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (ed.), The Lost Road and Other Writings, "Part Three: The Etymologies", entry RAMBÁ-