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Talk:Eärnur

[edit] ‘Third Line’?

There is no indication in Tolkien’s writing that the Kings of Gondor were ever categorised into ‘lines’, as the Kings of Rohan were. I am aware of some secondary material that does so, and while it isn’t outrightly incorrect, I would point out that the Kingship of Rohan jumped from one line to the other in the female line, whereas all jumps in the Kingship of Gondor were to male sidelines. So I would like to avoid any impression that the use of term for the Gondorian royal house is authentic.

Moreover, if one does count ‘lines’ of the Kings of Gondor, the second line started with Eärnil I, the third with Calmacil and the fourth with Tarondor, so Eärnur belonged to the fifth ‘line’, not the third. I’m therefore correcting the number and putting the term in quotes. — Mithrennaith 00:25, 8 September 2010 (UTC)

[edit] Last King of Gondor

The "last King of Gondor" is simply wrong. Elessar is the King of both Gondor and Arnor which indeed is technically the Reunited Kingdom, but it is Gondor and Arnor. So you can write last king of sole Gondor or last king only of Gondor, but to write "Last King of Gondor" is misleading and de facto wrong (and de iure controversial). --212.186.7.98 11:31, 29 May 2017 (UTC)

Gondor is not a Kingdom in its own right. It's the Reunited Kingdom of Gondor and Arnor. Elessar is no more "King of Gondor" than Elizabeth is "Queen of England". --Ederchil (Talk/Contribs/Edits) 12:11, 29 May 2017 (UTC)
Indeed she is still Queen of England (and Scotland). Gondor and Arnor are independent Kingdoms. Under the reign of Elendil, Isildur and Elessar they have the same King. "Earnur was the last King of Gondor" is simply wrong. It has to be formulated differently. The same in the article about Earendur where also is standing "last King of Arnor". That's wrong! Elessar is the (High) King of Gondor and Arnor. And if you think differently you would also have to change the template below with the Kings of Gondor. But that would be wrong. --212.186.7.98 13:10, 29 May 2017 (UTC)
I'm afraid I have to agree with 212.186.7.98. Tolkien on several occasions refers to Elessar as the "King of Gondor." Here are a few quotes:
"Let the Lord of the Black Land come forth! Justice shall be done upon him. For wrongfully he has made war upon Gondor and wrested its lands. Therefore the King of Gondor demands that he should atone for his evils, and depart then for ever. Come forth!"
― The Return of the King (Book V, Chapter 10)
"‘The King?’ said Sam. ‘What king, and who is he?’ ‘The King of Gondor and Lord of the Western Lands,’ said Gandalf; ‘and he has taken back all his ancient realm. He will ride soon to his crowning, but he waits for you.’"
― The Return of the King (Book VI, Chapter 4)
"Then the kings of Gondor and Rohan went to the Hallows and they came to the tombs in Rath Dínen, and they bore away King Théoden upon a golden bier, and passed through the City in silence. Then they laid the bier upon a great wain with Riders of Rohan all about it and his banner borne before; and Merry being Théoden’s esquire rode upon the wain and kept the arms of the king."
― The Return of the King (Book VI, Chapter 6)
"I did not, naturally, go into details about the way in which Aragorn, as King of Gondor, would govern the realm. But it was made clear that there was much fighting, and in the earlier years of A.’s reign expeditions against enemies in the East."
― The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien (Letter 244)
So although Aragorn was considered the King of the Reunited Kingdom, Tolkien also separately characterized him as King of its constituent parts. Thus, it would be appropriate to refer to him as a King of Gondor in this article. Protospace 02:58, 30 May 2017 (UTC)